[He26] Light and Sleep Patterns

AUTHOR: John Inglislight-02.jpg
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CROSSLINKS:

Database:
[026]
[027]
[028]
[029]
[030]
[In26]
[Mi26]
Prototypes:
[PiT]
Scenario Games: Action Plan: External:

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ACTORS/AGENTS
Trade Unions
Central government
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DESCRIPTION
Sleep patterns are, in part, defined by our exposure to levels of light. The pineal gland in the brain regulates the production of melatonin, which induces drowsiness, according to amount of eye that the eye receives. The less light the eye receives, the more melatonin is produced. By mimicing the bright light of the midday sun or the gradually fading light of a sunset you can trick the brain into inducing alertness or drowsiness. A lack of high levels of light over the course of a day can disrupt sleep patterns and induce depression and fatigue. Building regulations ensure that homes receive a certain amount of light by guaranteeing window space in new homes. However, night workers who sleep during the day can do not have access to natural light and must supplement their access to daylight somehow. _________________________________________________________________________________________
RESEARCH AGENDA
How can a public space be used to regulate sleep patterns?
How can daylight be supplemented for people who sleep during the day?
Which groups could make use of such a public space?